118 Comments

Thanks for taking so much time to respond! Shite is an English colliquialism, but since your English, like your spelling and grasp of logic is such shite…

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I used the word white supremacy, not racist. Racism is a competitive relationship between groups for ownership and control of resources for wealth and power - not about getting along. Racism is prejudice is power. Blacks aren't in the position of being racists, having only owning less than 2% of this country's wealth which hasn't changed since the eve of the American Civil War. Europeans got the affirmative action and headstart programs through billions of acres of free indigenous land (genocide), Black chattel slavery, colonization, and structural racism. Europeans created the the social construct of race and the racial hierarchy in this world. For example, the Vietnamese will not sun bathe at China Beach for fear of getting dark per my guide.

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I am subscribed to sub stack so I can hear Glenn Loury why is it impossible to get the app or to episodically get it don’t get on ….it’s irritating.

MDB

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I worked in a very machevellan environment dealing with white supremacists like you. It added to my warrior spirit, and shedded much light on my naiveness.

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How would your employer feel about your white racist comments? Lol!!!!

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I worked in law enforcement for 34 years. Most protestors were non violent. White supremacist groups were also involved in some of the violence and burning of property to incite chaos and pssubly a race war. You don't know what you're talking about. I live in an afluent 32-home development with 6 Black families who are successful with intact family units. My wife and I come from 2 parent homes. Quit looking at Fox News and other fellacious white media. After the January 6 Capitol insurrection, I stocked up on firearms, ammunition, and other essentials due to activities similar to having led to fascism in Europe in the 1930s. I seriously advise you to read, "Cracker Culture - Celtic Ways in the Old South" by Professor Grady McWhiney. You'll gain more empirical insight about some of the issues in this country. Dr. Thomas Sowell, a Black conservative economist and writer, related whites have their n*gg*rs and Blacks have their rednecks. He supports his argument empirically. BTW, crackers used to hang Italians here in Georgia.

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As a supervisor and manager I strongly desired the most skillful, making my job easier. I also strongly desired skillful people above me. I've worked for some incompetent administrators, a number encouraging illegal activities.

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On homework; it was because my Spanish professor saw my homework at UCLA, that she was able to pull me aside and show me how I had made a methodical error, that if ignored would have become more severe. Her intervention allowed me to get back on track. By end of quarter, I was among top performers.

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Mar 17·edited Mar 17

Glenn, it was interesting hearing you and James Gates discussing the idea that tests might miss out on diamonds in the rough because some decades ago two individuals who would later go on to become renowned physicists both missed out on the top 1% IQ 135 cutoff on a statewide test administered by Lewis Terman to California youth to identify potential geniuses. Luis Alvarez and William Shockley both failed to make this relatively modest cutoff despite later going on to become Nobel prize winning physicists.

As the article linked to below argues, the most likely reason for this was because the particular test that was administered was verbally loaded and failed to adequately assess spatial ability, which along with quantitative and verbal ability is considered to be one of the three core components of intelligence. While we often talk about intelligence as a unitary construct, many individuals are skewed towards either mathematical or verbal aptitude and the magnitude of this split has a significant impact on the particular domain one pursues in life.

It’s been asserted that spatial ability is particularly crucial for fields such as engineering and physics and there’s speculation that differences in spatial ability between men and women account for at least some of the disparity between the genders in these more quantitative fields. Anyway, hearing you guys discussing physics and standardized tests and William Shockley reminded me of all this. I think it's possible that testing might miss out on diamonds in the rough, although the argument here is that we should be testing for the most relevant cognitive abilities for each field.

Personally, I find it interesting that William Shockley was such an adamant proponent of psychometrics despite not having qualified for the Terman cutoff earlier in his life.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/recognizing-spatial-intel/

"Ninety years ago, Stanford psychologist Lewis Terman began an ambitious search for the brightest kids in California, administering IQ tests to several thousand[s] of children across the state. Those scoring above an IQ of 135 (approximately the top 1 percent of scores) were tracked for further study. There were two young boys, Luis Alvarez and William Shockley, who were among the many who took Terman’s tests but missed the cutoff score. Despite their exclusion from a study of young “geniuses,” both went on to study physics, earn PhDs, and win the Nobel prize.

How could these two minds, both with great potential for scientific innovation, slip under the radar of IQ tests? One explanation is that many items on Terman’s Stanford-Binet IQ test, as with many modern assessments, fail to tap into a cognitive ability known as spatial ability. Recent research on cognitive abilities is reinforcing what some psychologists suggested decades ago: spatial ability, also known as spatial visualization, plays a critical role in engineering and scientific disciplines. Yet more verbally-loaded IQ tests, as well as many popular standardized tests used today, do not adequately measure this trait, especially in those who are most gifted with it."

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Is that a trick question? It's too easy if it is on the up-&-up. Racist only if one of the following prevails: (1) Homework assignments between white & black kids are not equal across the board; (2) their test answers and papers assigned are unequal across the spectrum, or scored differently; (3) both groups have equal time to take or do the test or write the assignment. The chance to succeed or fail must be equal to be fair. The only possible joker in the deck would be if the material were slanted against the truths known to blacks thanks to the black experience, which would require them to lie just to pass the test.

The post below by Monty Jamerson gives an answer to some other question, not the one asked. I hope no others, whose responses I've not yet read, don't go off a similar deep end, with an irrelevant response.

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Thomas Jefferson, the religious pessimist --- "Like many other 18th-century intellectuals in Europe and North America, Jefferson believed blacks were inferior to whites. In his only book, Notes on the State of Virginia (1785), Jefferson expressed racist views of blacks’ abilities, though he questioned whether the differences he observed were due to inherent inferiority or to decades of degrading enslavement. He also believed that white Americans and enslaved blacks constituted two “separate nations” who could not live together peacefully in the same country. Of this inevitable rift, he wrote:

“Deep rooted prejudices entertained by the whites; ten thousand recollections, by the blacks, of the injuries they have sustained ... will divide us into parties and produce convulsions, which will probably never end but in the extermination of one or the other race.

MLK related before his assassination (advocating for reparations), "we got integration, but I feel that I have led my people into a burning house...my dream has turned into a nightmare."

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More access to interracial sex? I'm on the floor rolling around in uncontrollable laughter in my second home on a beautiful beach. The Asian babe (lawyer) that's lying next to me is wondering about the size of your manhood. Can you salsa, meringue, cha-cha, or Chicago step? 😂🤣😅😆😁😄😃😀

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If you can derive unearned resources from it, anything can be racist today!

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I think the key to what Dr. Gates was saying about engaging with other ideas is, essentially, asking too much: the purpose of any intellectual discussion (as opposed to a pseudo intellectual monologue) is the concept that one *might* just learn something, and *possibly* even change one’s mind! Unfortunately, these concepts are anathema to wokeism, which is a dogma (not a philosophy).

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No but it still may qualify as a violation of one's civil rights if deemed cruel and unusual punishment lol

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I had Jim Gates teach a class on mine in my masters program and he was certainly a delight. I remember there was a week where most of the discussion revolved around diversity in STEM and the sciences, and it was surprisingly one of my favorite weeks.

Additionally, he was the only professor to try to understand the Trump phenomenon with empathy and understanding. He made a good faith effort to understand the rationale of the average Trump voter (he believes that most of it stems from the fallout of the 2008 financial crisis). That may seem mundane, but I think it’s a good bellweather of independent thinker (especially for his position/pedigree). So glad to see him on your show!

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